Mission Statement

The Texas School of Music, a Texas organization, will endeavor to promote the love of music in all people by teaching, encouraging and helping to fulfill the dreams of aspiring musicians of all ages and degrees of talent. We intend to supply opportunities for performance and resources for musical growth as well as preserve the diverse and rich cultural heritage of Texas music.

 

"CAMARO" 
Written by Doug Milford and Bobby Boyd....
   


Performed By Bobby Boyd. 
                                                                              
   

BRIEF HISTORY OF THE CROSSROADS

 

After the Civil War ended, the cotton and sugar cane production in the areas declined.  A new industry, lumbering, would soon take the place of the previous enterprises, but only after the establishment of the town of Shepherd.  Benjamin Armistead Shepherd and Colonel Paul Bremond dreamed of building a Railroad to penetrate the great piney woods of East Texas to create the lumber industry for Texas and found the town of shepherd.  This was to be their Centennial project in 1876, the 100th anniversary of America.

Bremond had hired W. E. Woods a surveyor (who had laid out the town of Houston for the Allen Brothers) to lay out the route of his new road into the heart of the shadows of the piney woods of East Texas. W. E. Woods drove a T-rail 100 feet from the old historical pecan tree that would be the end of the first survey point and layout for the town of Shepherd, Texas. The newly formed county of San Jacinto was named for the famous battle that gave birth to Texas.
            While working on putting a railroad through Shepherd, B.A.. Shepherd, along with Captain Frank Hardin and Colonel George W. Davis, built a house on a 50 acre tract for their close friend Colonel Paul Bremond, the Father of the Texas Railroad.  This was the first house ever built in Shepherd.  The house stands on what is known as the crossroads, an old Indian trail leading from chief Colita's village to Chief Long King’s village.  Chief Colita and Sam Houston used it as a council site.  They met there on one occasion to recruit for the Texas Revolution.  Mr. Houston carved his initials on the pecan tree which now overlooks the house.  The Dixon family and the towns people stated Sam Houston’s initials were visible until approximately 1920.

            After Paul Bremond died, the house went into receivership and was known as the “Station House”.  It was then acquired by Sam Houston Cochran, General Sam Houston’s Godson, in 1889.  S.H. Cochran sold the house to William Samuel Dixon in 1899.  W.S. Dixon was a prominent family mercantile businessman and the owner/operator of Napier Sawmill South of Shepherd.  This was the first house in Shepherd to have gas lights and running water piped from the mill across the street. It was the first house in Shepherd and San Jacinto County to have a telephone that was connected to his mercantile store and have electrical lights.  The house remained in the Dixon family until 1958.

The house was then sold to Roland and Betsy Tisinger of The Houston post, and used as a center for teaching individuals to read and play music.  The Shepherd library began on the porch of this house”.  The school of music and the library remained until 1972 when she built a library behind her house.  It remained there until they used the library’s funds, a matching grant and inventory to build the new Shepherd Public Library housed out of the Old Mc Clain’s Super Market.  After the house was gutted by fire, it was sold to Douglas and Brenda Milford in 1981.  It was their dream to return the house to it’s historical preservation of music to be open to the public.  It now houses The Texas School of Music and Cross Roads Restaurant.  The Texas School of Music, a Texas organization, will endeavor to promote the love of music in all people by teaching, encouraging and helping to fulfill the dreams of aspiring musicians of all ages and degrees of talent.  We intend to supply opportunities for performance and resources for musical growth as well as preserve the diverse and rich cultural heritage of Texas music.

 

 
 
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